Blog
Coming soon.

Posts for: August, 2014

By Artistic & Family Dental
August 29, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
KnowingWhattoExpectWiththeImplantProcess

Dental implants have emerged as the premier replacement option for lost teeth. Their life-like appearance, durability and versatility have made them extremely popular with patients.

Implants aren’t a quick fix, though: in most cases the process takes months to complete. Here’s a chronological overview of what you can expect if you decide on dental implants.

Stage 1: Planning. The process begins at least a few weeks before the actual implantation with an examination to determine what’s best for your individual case. Implant materials and designs are quite numerous, enabling us to precisely match individual tooth types, shapes, lengths and color. We then use x-rays or CT scanning to identify the best locations for the implants — careful planning here increases the chances that implantation will go smoothly and the final outcome will be aesthetically pleasing.

Stage 2: Implantation. Once we’ve finished planning, it’s time to surgically insert the titanium implants into the pre-determined locations in the jawbone identified during Stage 1. While this procedure is relatively minor and routine, the surgeon still operates with precision and care to ensure the best functional and aesthetic outcome.

Stage 3: Integration. In most cases after implantation, we’ll need to wait for a few weeks before attaching the final crowns. Because bone has an affinity for titanium, it will grow and adhere to the implant during this waiting period, anchoring it securely into the bone that will increase its long-term durability. We attach temporary teeth made of acrylic plastic (along with giving you some precautions on biting and chewing) to help you function normally during the waiting period.

Stage 4: A Transformed Smile! Once integration has been achieved and the gum tissues fully healed, we can then attach the permanent crowns. These crowns are typically made of strong, durable materials that will fit the healed gum tissues more precisely than your temporary crowns. Depending on the type of implant used, the crowns are either cemented or screwed into place onto the implant.

The process of dental implantation involves a lot of time, effort and precision. In the end, though, it’s well worth it — the joy of new teeth that will function well for years and look great too!

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “New Teeth in One Day.”


By Artistic & Family Dental
August 20, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   cavity  
AreCavitiesContagious

Think of a contagious disease and you may picture one of the great outbreaks of the past: the terrible flu epidemic of 1918, the ever-present threat of polio in the early 20th Century, and the ancient (and still widespread) danger of cholera in overcrowded urban areas. Or you may think of the common cold, a familiar contagious malady that’s still very much with us. Yet there’s one contagious disease you may not think of, but probably should: tooth decay.

Many people don’t realize that tooth decay is contagious. But the fact is, decay bacteria can be passed between people like a bad cold — and it happens all the time.

Sugar usually gets the blame for tooth decay; a recent survey found that 81 percent of Americans say it’s responsible for cavities. But sugar alone isn’t the culprit. Cavities are actually caused by certain types of bacteria that cling to the teeth in the absence of proper oral hygiene. These bacteria process sugar from the foods we eat, and then secrete acidic byproducts that erode the hard enamel of the teeth. This causes the formation of the tiny holes we call cavities.

Children aren’t born with S. Mutans. But studies show that most of them “catch” it from their caregivers — often, their parents. By the time they are two years old, over 80 percent of kids will have detectable levels of the bacteria. Whether or not they pick up harmful microorganisms — and how much they have — depends on the infectiousness of the strain, and on the caregiver’s attention to oral hygiene.

How can you prevent the spread of decay-causing bacteria? Essentially, by limiting its transfer from your mouth to your baby’s mouth. So don’t “clean” a baby’s pacifier by putting it in your mouth, and don’t share utensils — for example, by tasting baby’s food with his or her spoon. While it’s ever so tempting, avoid kissing baby’s lips, especially if there is a chance of transferring saliva. And don’t even think of “pre-chewing” baby’s food — no matter what some self-appointed health gurus may say.

There’s still another way to limit the spread of decay-causing microorganisms: Make sure your own practice of oral hygiene is top-notch! Oral bacteria can spread not only from parents to babies, but also between adults. Maintaining good oral health means brushing and flossing every day, and getting regular check-ups: It’s important for you, and for everyone you care about.

If you have questions about tooth decay prevention or oral hygiene care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Tooth Decay” and “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”


By Artistic & Family Dental
August 15, 2014
Category: Oral Health
DoesYourToothbrushNeedACleaning

When you’re trying to maintain a good oral hygiene routine, your toothbrush is bound to see a lot of action. Day in and day out, it gets used about twice a day, every day — morning and night, whether you’re feeling great or under the weather, in a hurry or not. And it's stored in the bathroom: a moist environment with the potential for exposure to plenty of bacteria (and not just the ones that live in your mouth). So after all of that service, does your toothbrush itself need any particular care or cleaning — and do you need to worry about getting sick from brushing?

Let’s answer the last question first. It’s very unlikely that you can re-infect yourself with an illness (a cold, for example) from using your own toothbrush. That’s because once you’ve been infected, the antibodies that are built up in response to the invading germs will generally prevent you from getting the same disease for some time afterward. Using someone else’s toothbrush, however, is a never a good idea — especially if they are sick (whether they show any symptoms or not), and doubly so if the bristles are still wet. It’s very possible to transfer all kinds of bacteria — even the bacteria that cause tooth decay — from person to person this way.

Can bacteria really survive for any length of time on your toothbrush? The short answer is yes, as they can (and do) live almost everywhere. But for people in a normal state of health, there’s no real reason to worry: Through long exposure, your body is generally quite capable of defending itself from these microorganisms. The American Dental Association states, “[T]here is insufficient clinical evidence to support that bacterial growth on toothbrushes will lead to specific adverse oral or systemic health effects.”

However, if you or a family member have a compromised immune system (due to radiation treatment, chemotherapy or disease, for example), it might make sense to take some precautions. Using an antibacterial mouthrinse before you brush can reduce the amount of bacteria in your mouth — and on your toothbrush. Washing the brush afterward with an antimicrobial cleaner or sanitizer can also decrease the level of bacteria that remains on the toothbrush.

For everyone else, it’s best to follow a few common-sense steps for toothbrush care: Rinse your brush with tap water after you use it, to remove any remaining toothpaste and debris; store it upright, where it can air-dry before it’s used again (not in a closed container, where bacteria can thrive); and get a new brush every three months. Your toothbrush is a major weapon in the fight against tooth decay — keeping it in good shape will help you maintain a healthy mouth and a healthy body.

If you have questions about toothbrushing or oral hygiene care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Hygiene Behavior.”


By Artistic & Family Dental
August 04, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
ProtectYourVeneersWithaFewCommonSensePrecautions

Porcelain veneers are a proven way to achieve a new smile. Composed of thin layers of dental porcelain and other materials laminated together to form one life-like unit, veneers are applied to the outside of a prepared natural tooth to enhance its appearance. Given the right circumstances, they’re an excellent solution for correcting mild to moderate spaces between teeth, slight deviations in tooth position, and problems with the color and shape of a tooth.

Veneers are very strong and can resist most of the forces you generate when you chew your food. But dental porcelain is also a form of glass — strong but not indestructible. Following a few maintenance guidelines will help you avoid damaging a porcelain veneer and incurring additional dental care costs.

Practice daily oral hygiene. Although veneers aren’t subject to disease or decay, the tooth structure they cover and the surrounding gum tissues are. You should, therefore, brush and floss veneered teeth just as you would any other tooth. And, there’s no need for specially formulated toothpastes — any non-abrasive fluoride brand will work.

Avoid excessive biting or chewing. While it’s a good practice for natural teeth to avoid applying too much biting force to hard materials, it’s especially important for veneers. Attempting to open hard-shell nuts with your teeth or chewing on bones, pencils and other hard objects are just a few of the activities that could lead to a shattered veneer.

Use a bite guard for clenching habits. People who excessively grind or clench their teeth (a condition called bruxism) can also put undue stress on their veneers. We can help alleviate some of this stress by fashioning a bite guard you wear at night. The guard will help protect your veneers from teeth grinding while you sleep.

Limit foods and drinks that cause staining. Tea, coffee, wine and similar substances can leave teeth stained and dingy. Although your new veneers won’t typically stain, the natural teeth around them can — the brighter veneers would then stand out prominently from the dingier natural teeth.

Porcelain veneers are proven “smile changers.” Taking care of them with a few common sense precautions will ensure the change is long-lasting.

If you would like more information on porcelain veneers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Smile Design Enhanced With Porcelain Veneers.”


By Artistic & Family Dental
August 01, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dentures  
TheDenturesAreComing

How much do you really know about Revolutionary War hero and famous disturber-of-the-peace Paul Revere? Take this quiz and find out! True or False:

  1. Paul Revere cried “The British are coming!”
  2. Paul Revere rode to Concord, Massachusetts.
  3. Paul Revere practiced dentistry.

The first two answers are false: Revere, like most colonists, considered himself British at the time (but might have said “the regulars” are coming); and he never made it as far as Concord, though one of his midnight-riding companions did. The last statement, however, is true: When things got slow in his regular trade of silversmithing, Revere hung out a shingle to broadcast his skills as a dentist.

“Paul Revere can fix [teeth] as well as any surgeon dentist who ever came from London, he fixes [dentures] in such a manner that they are not only an ornament but of real use in speaking and eating,” his advertisement in a Boston newspaper is supposed to have read. Revere specialized in fitting dentures made of metal and walrus ivory in his patient’s mouths. (There is no record, however, that he ever worked on George Washington’s false teeth.)

The practice of dentistry has come a long way since 1776. But the ideal set of dentures — one that’s both aesthetically pleasing and fully functional — remains a valid goal today. But now, instead of going to a metalworker, you’ll visit a denture specialist: your dentist.

We understand that dentures need to have a perfect, comfortable fit so they can do their work. That’s why we take the time to make an individual mold of your mouth as the first step of the process. Then we choose prosthetic teeth in the shape, size and shade that’s right for you. When everything is satisfactory, the dentures will be custom-fabricated in a dental laboratory using high-quality materials that are lifelike and durable. Finally, we will make sure that your new dentures look, feel and function the way they should.

If you have older dentures that no longer fit as they should, come in to our office for a check-up. It’s sometimes possible to repair or re-line dentures; in other cases, it’s best to have a new set made. Ill-fitting dentures aren’t just uncomfortable — they can also lead to oral infections and nutritional difficulties.

For more information about dentures or denture repair, please contact our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Loose Dentures” and “Removable Full Dentures.”