Denver Emergency Dental Services

Dental emergencies can happen at any time day or night. That is why Artistic Dental has 24-hour emergency dental services available to you.

If you are suffering a dental emergency, please call our office (303-758-2980) and we will see you right away.

After Hours Emergency Dental Care

For afterhours dental emergencies, call the office and follow instructions on the voicemail to be redirected to our emergency phone and connected to Dr. Z and Dr. Chang so that you can speak to a dentist right away. Our dentist will assess your emergency and provide a solution for immediate care.

Emergency Toothache Help

Toothaches can come up suddenly and make you and your mouth miserable. It is always a good idea to get to a dentist when your toothache starts before it gets worse. If you are experiencing discomfort without any triggering event such as chewing, etc., we recommend you schedule an appointment for a comprehensive dental exam to avoid a dental emergency. However, if you fear you are already having a dental emergency, call us right away and let us know you need a limited exam, also known as an emergency exam, and we will fit you in right away.

What is considered a dental emergency?

Intense Toothache or Tooth Pain

Toothache in the form of intermittent sharp pain, or throbbing pain, or pain that is keeping you awake at night (symptomatic irreversible pulpitis, symptomatic apical periodontitis, tooth fracture). Often when a toothache is experienced, this is a sign a tooth either has a crack or cavity extending to the pulp chamber (chamber where the blood vessel and nerve are) or below the crest of bone surrounding the tooth. The dentist will take x-rays, perform a clinical exam and likely review options such as root canal therapy, crown placement or extraction.

Abscessed Tooth

An abscessed tooth may be accompanied by pain but often times is not. An abscess will appear as a little pimple on your gums. When a tooth is abscessed it either requires root canal therapy or extraction, the dentist will take x-rays, perform a clinical exam and discuss options. (abscess, necrotic pulp)

Broken or cracked tooth

Similar to tooth pain, a broken tooth may need root canal therapy, crown placement, extraction, or simple filling. The dentist will take x-rays, perform a clinical exam and review options, so you can understand and be involved in the decision making of your care. (tooth fracture)

Sore or Swollen Gums

Painful gums can be due to buildup of plaque and calculus, or if it is localized to one area it’s possible you are experiencing a cracked tooth. Resolutions for this type of discomfort range from deep cleanings to root canal, crown placement to extraction.

Lost Crown

If you are missing a crown, the crown may be able to be recemented or a new crown fabricated. Bring your crown in and we will see what we can do!

Trauma to the Mouth or Jaw

Trauma to the head region causing sore or painful tooth: treatment options range from simple filling placement, root canal therapy, crown placement, extraction, or even in some cases monitoring for natural healing. (luxation, tooth concussion)

Exposed Nerve

treatment for exposed nerves are likely root canal therapy, this is the process in which the infected exposed nerve is cleaned out and sterile material is placed. For best results, a crown is placed afterward to prevent risk of fracture or bacterial re-exposure and reinfection. (symptomatic or asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis, necrotic pulp)

Knocked Out Tooth

If your tooth has been knocked out due to trauma (tooth avulsion), come into the clinic to see if any pieces of the tooth are left that need to be removed or if the tooth can be reimplanted. Pick the tooth up by the crown (the white part), and avoid touching the root of the tooth. If the tooth is dirty, wash it briefly (maximum 10 seconds) under cold running water and reposition it into the socket. Once the tooth is back in, bite on a handkerchief or cloth to hold it in position and come into the clinic for care. If you cannot reimplant your tooth in your mouth transport it to the office in a glass of milk or place it inside your cheek and hold it in your mouth until you arrive to the clinic. Avoid swallowing the tooth and do NOT store it in water.

Impacted wisdom teeth

An impacted wisdom tooth itself is not an emergency, but it can lead to emergencies such as pericoronitis. If you are starting to feel pain in the area of your wisdom teeth, call us for an exam.

Pericoronitis

If you are having inflammation of the soft tissue (gums) overlying an unerupted wisdom teeth, you may be experiencing periocoronitis. Pericoronitis can be very painful and treatment includes a round of antibiotics and wisdom tooth removal.

Emergency Dental FAQ's

Can I get same day emergency dental visits?

When you call our dentist will answer and speak with you to assess the situation. If you need emergency assistance we will determine the best course of action and provide same day service as needed.

What types of procedures does an emergency dentist provide?

Dental emergencies can include extractions, root canals, fillings, and crowns. The treatment you receive will depend on the condition of your tooth and surrounding tissue.

Will my insurance cover emergency dental visits?

It will depend upon what insurance you have. We accept all major insurance providers and your plan will determine whether or not you are covered for emergency dental. Most plans do cover some level of emergent dental.

How do I know when to go to the emergency room instead of the emergency dentist?

If you are experiencing difficulty breathing, swelling that has extended to your neck or eye, redness of the skin (facial cellulitis), please report to the emergency room.

Definition of Dental Emergency Terminology

Abscess

An infection at the apex of a tooth, oftentimes shows up as a radiolucency on x ray.

Fistula

An infection on the gums, stemming from the abscess at the apex of the tooth. Your body forms a fistula to alleviate pressure. This may appear as a pimple on the gums which can come and go, it is filled with suppuration (pus).

Symptomatic irreversible pulpitis

When a cavity is deep enough to touch the nerve, the diagnosis is called “irreversible pulpitis.” When this is accompanied with symptoms such as hot and cold sensitivity, it is termed “symptomatic” irreversible pulpitis.

Asymptomatic irreversible pulpitis

Sometimes irreversible pulpitis causes no symptoms although the cavity is touching the pulp. When no symptoms are present it is termed “asymptomatic” irreversible pulpitis. Although no symptoms are present, treatment of the infection is still necessary.

Necrotic pulp

When a cavity or crack extends to the pulp and causes the tissue inside of the pulp (the blood vessel and nerve) to die.

Symptomatic apical periodontitis

Apical periodontitis is when infection from the tooth has reached the apex of the tooth and spread out into the bone. When this is accompanied with symptoms such as biting pain, it is termed “symptomatic apical periodontitis.”

Asymptomatic apical periodontitis

Sometimes apical periodontitis it is not accompanied with pain on biting, although an infection is present. This is termed “asymptomatic” apical periodontitis. Although no symptoms are present, treatment of the infection is still necessary.

Asymptomatic apical periodontitis

Sometimes apical periodontitis it is not accompanied with pain on biting, although an infection is present. This is termed “asymptomatic” apical periodontitis. Although no symptoms are present, treatment of the infection is still necessary.

Concussion

A tooth concussion is when a tooth has received trauma, but has not been broken or fractured, nor moved out of the socket. The tooth will be tender to touch or tapping, but not mobile.

Subluxation

When a tooth has received trauma, is tender to touch, tapping and has increased mobility, but has not been displaced from the socket.

Luxation

When a tooth has received trauma and has been moved in the socket. Bone around the tooth may be broken, but the tooth remains in the socket.

Avulsion

When a tooth has received trauma and is no longer in the socket.

Tooth fracture

When part of a tooth is missing or cracked, often due to trauma. There are many different types of fractures: enamel fractures, dentin-enamel fractures, and dentin-enamel-pulp fractures.

Pericoronitis

Inflammation of the soft tissue overlying a tooth that has not fully erupted. This can be accompanied by swelling and severe pain. Most often this is found over unerupted wisdom teeth.

Impacted wisdom tooth

A wisdom tooth (3rd molar) that has not erupted. These may lie dormant for many years or become infected and cause pain and require extraction.

Facial cellulitis

When infection from a tooth spreads throughout the face. It may extend to the cheeks, area around and behind the eyes, onto the neck, behind the ears. Tissue may be swollen, red, and/or warm. This can be life threatening. If you are experiencing facial cellulitis, please report to the Emergency Department immediately.

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